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  • Understanding KeyMander Mouse Settings

    To help better answer some of the common questions about mouse performance, here's some basics about several things that determine how the mouse responds in-game: Sensitivity Setting, Maximum Turn Speed, In-Game Acceleration Setting, Diagonal Acceleration Setting, Deadzone Setting and Resolution.

    The biggest reason to love KeyMander can quickly become a frustration if the mouse isn’t setup properly, so here is some information that may help you to better dial in your mouse settings. KeyMander is designed to provide as close to a PC gaming experience as possible on a game console, however there are a couple significant differences between playing on PC and using a keyboard and mouse with your console. Understanding differences in maximum turn speed and learning how to work with mouse sensitivity and acceleration are the keys to playing at the highest level with KeyMander. Getting to that level requires some also time spent learning how your mouse settings translate into the game, and also understanding the limitations of console games.

    Sensitivity Setting (KeyMander Software)
    Properly setting mouse sensitivity is the biggest factor in getting good mouse performance with your KeyMander, and there is more to it than simply adjusting the sensitivity sliders in the KeyMander software. There are actually three other steps required before adjusting the software sliders, and forgetting them will lead to poor mouse performance. The first and most commonly overlooked step in properly setting up the mouse is actually making sure the aim/look sensitivity is maxed out in the game’s settings menu, so you have the full sensitivity range to work within. Next, the KeyMander software has a settings menu where you need to input the mouse’s maximum DPI resolution for a smoother and more accurate adjustment range. Third, most gaming mice have a DPI button with multiple settings so make sure the mouse is set to the highest DPI step when connected to KeyMander. Only after those steps are complete do you begin making changes to the mouse sensitivity sliders. Just like in PC gaming, bumping the sensitivity too high will cause you to reach a point where movement can become jittery and difficult to use accurately for precision shots, so reaching a balance is important. In the PC world this equates to the balance between low DPI and high DPI settings, where lower DPI is far more accurate for making small, precise movements (like needed for headshots) at the cost of having to move your hand a foot or more to turn a 360° rotation. In the older days of first-person-shooters, gamers playing titles like Counter Strike on standard definition monitors might have mouse resolutions set as low as 100 or 200 dpi, so they can snap off a headshot (without a scope) like it’s nothing. That type of play is a far cry from the common Rambo-esque, hard-charging free-for-all styles we see now in Call of Duty deathmatches, so just like in PC gaming, finding your own balance point is the key. If you run around in CoD with a shotgun and never aim-down-sight, having a highly boosted sensitivity may be fine for you, but if you later decide to pick up a sniper rifle you probably aren’t going to be happy at that setting. To get a better feel for how to best set your mouse sensitivity, start at a point where you think the sensitivity is way too low, and move your mouse back and forth. Get a feel for the ability to find your aim point accurately, then boost your speed until you can get the accuracy you want, at a comfortable enough speed to stay within the game’s maximum turn speed or at least not far beyond it. Remember each game is different, and the difference can be huge when comparing a game like CoD: Black Ops III that has a high max turn speed, versus a game like Resident Evil 7 where you can use a watch to time how long it takes to spin around. By the way, several games actually have different horizontal and vertical look sensitivities that usually go unnoticed with analog sticks, but much more noticeable with a mouse. If vertical movement feels different than horizontal movement and you want to adjust it, you can unlock the horizontal and vertical mouse sensitivity sliders in the KeyMander software and adjust as needed.

    Maximum Turn Speed (In-Game)
    The biggest difference between playing on a PC versus playing on a console with KeyMander is the turn speed limitation built into console games. Because console games are built for joysticks, every game has a maximum turn speed equal to having the analog thumb stick pushed all the way to the farthest position. This is the turn speed limit of the game set by the game developers and it basically caps the speed at which you can turn (look) in a given direction, no matter how fast you move the thumb stick (or mouse as in our case). You can test this with your controller by pushing the right thumb stick all the way left or right, and the speed at which your view rotates is the maximum turn speed for that game. This limit can vary widely from game to game as games like the Call of Duty franchise for example have a much higher turn speed limit that the Destiny franchise which can feel like the mouse is slow to respond if you do not adjust your settings and style of play a bit. The turn speed limit can even vary within a game depending on factors such as weapon choice, whether or not you’re in a vehicle, location in the game (especially in campaign modes), etc. Games can also have different horizontal and vertical turn speed limits, although vertical limits are normally less of an issue.

    It is important to understand the game's maximum turn speed and the effect it has on mouse performance, since a mouse can deliver faster average and peak movement speeds than a thumb stick allows. When you exceed the game’s maximum turn speed (moving the mouse faster than the game allows), the mouse will feel sluggish or "laggy" as your on-screen aim/look view moves less than expected. An easy way to see this is to move your mouse at a fairly slow rate noticing how far you rotate, then move extremely fast and compare. If your KeyMander profile is set up with very high aim/look sensitivity, you probably noticed that by moving slowly you rotated 360 degrees or more with a short swipe, but by moving very fast you rotated only a short distance. That poor movement you just experienced is NOT mouse lag, but rather the game's turn speed limit.

    The easiest way to understand what is happening is to equate the maximum turning speed to distance turned (rotated) in a period of time. For example, let’s say with the aim/look thumb stick fully engaged it takes our game one full second to perform a 360° rotation, that would make our game’s maximum turning speed equal to one rotation per second. Now to illustrate how that pertains to our mouse, let’s say that with our current KeyMander profile moving the mouse four inches in one second performs a full rotation; it would mean our max turn speed with the mouse is 4 inches per second. Now here is where the turn speed limit begins to show up with a mouse: if we move 8 inches in one second (double the limit in our example), the extra movement above the maximum turn speed is not registered and it’s as if you moved for only half the distance or half the time (equal to a half rotation for our example). Following the same formula if we move it 16 inches (four times the limit), your on-screen aim/look view moves only a quarter of the time/distance (equal to a quarter rotation for our example), and so on. Simply put, once you hit maximum turn speed, the faster you move the mouse, the slower you go. Unlike on a PC, using a mouse in an environment designed for a joystick also requires getting used to playing within the game’s turn speed limitation, but it’s a small trade-off for being able to play console games with a mouse and keyboard and it's easy to set up your KeyMander profiles to work within this limitation.

    In-Game Acceleration Setting (KeyMander Software)
    One way to overcome turn speed limitations is through the use of in-game acceleration, which progressively boosts your aim/look speed the faster you move. Slower movements stay slow and precise, but quick movements ramp up the turn speed to make spinning around much easier in games with lower turn speed limitations. Acceleration is usually avoided by most PC gamers since noticeable turn speed limitations are rare in PC games, however some console game designers understand that acceleration can be beneficial at times, and have begun adding the option in some games. TitanFall 2 is a perfect example, having programmable acceleration levels and curves in the game’s settings menu. The KeyMander software also has adjustable acceleration and programmable mouse response curves to add similar functionality to games without these adjustments. When setting up your game profiles, remember to treat acceleration like salt at the dinner table; it’s there if you need it, but if it’s already good you probably shouldn’t add anything.

    The In-Game Acceleration slider adjusts the amount of positive or negative acceleration that KeyMander adds when moving your mouse. A setting of 35 on the slider is equal to zero acceleration added by KeyMander. Settings of 36-100 add progressively greater amounts of aim acceleration to compensate for games with a slow aim/look mechanic. Settings of 1-34 add negative acceleration (or deceleration) to compensate for games with progressively boosted aim/look mechanics. When tuning your profiles it is always best to start at 35 and begin making adjustments as needed. For best accuracy remember to tune your Aim/Look sensitivity first, then fine tune the In-Game Acceleration as needed for your style of play. Here's a quick visual of how the In-Game Acceleration settings work:

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    Diagonal Acceleration Setting (KeyMander Software)
    The Diagonal Acceleration slider adjusts the amount of vertical correction applied when moving the mouse horizontally, to help keep the aim/look view level when making fast, long turns. This feature is designed to help so when spinning 180 degrees to see and enemy behind you, a slightly angled mouse swipe doesn’t cause you to be aiming above their head or below their feet. The cost for this ability is a loss of precision when making diagonal movements or small movements like when aiming-down-sight for sniping. A setting of 50 on the slider is equal to maximum vertical correction applied by KeyMander, and settings of 51-99 add decreasing amounts of correction up to 100 where zero correction is applied. Settings below 50 should never be used as they prevent diagonal movement almost entirely. Depending on the game, most users will see improved performance accuracy in long turns with settings between 75-85, and advanced users will still see some benefits between 85-95. High level users that want little to no correction should select a setting of 95 or above.

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    Deadzone Setting (KeyMander Software and In-Game Options)
    If you are having problems with getting a smooth response from the mouse, especially when moving diagonally, take a look at the DeadZone setting. The Deadzone’s primary function is to overcome the area of the controller where joystick movement does not register in-game and allow instant response from the mouse, but when improperly adjusted it also influences mouse movement in a negative way. Having the deadzone set too low will cause choppy mouse response as initial mouse movements or very tiny mouse movements are suppressed. Having too large a deadzone will cause a floaty or accelerated feeling (pixel skipping), and can also cause a rough, “stair-step-like” movement in some games that reduces accuracy when moving the mouse diagonally. Some games also include a deadzone setting in the Options Menu, so be sure to check it and set accordingly for best performance. It is important to achieve the right balance, so if it feels choppy increase your deadzone setting and if the diagonal movement feels poor, lower the deadzone setting in the KeyMander software, in the game menu or both.

    Resolution (Mouse Hardware/Software & KeyMander Software)
    The conventional wisdom for setting mouse resolution with KeyMander is normally to set the mouse to its maximum resolution (up to 10K) and set the KeyMander dpi setting to match it. This will provide the maximum amount of adjustment range with fine adjustment steps in between. While this normally works great with most games, there will be times when a lower dpi setting is actually advantageous. Games with built-in Aim Assist such as the Call of Duty titles, Overwatch, etc. will benefit from having a lower dpi setting which allows the aim assist to better “pull” you onto the target’s hit box. Having a higher dpi setting sends more data at a faster rate to the aim assist processing and causes what amounts to an overload situation, where the aim assist function is decreased or defeated altogether.

    In games with aim assist it is important to test different resolution (dpi) settings so you can maximize the benefit (or remove it) for your style of play. For example, Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 works very well with mouse resolutions between 3500-5000dpi for those that like the slightly magnetic feel of aim assist. If you prefer to snipe headshots, set the dpi higher at 6-10K to help breakout of the aim assist bubble as it will tend to "pull" you down when trying to snap quick headshots. Just make sure to match your KeyMander dpi to your mouse dpi or your sensitivity will be way off.

    As a final note, I should also mention that one of the things that can complicate getting proper mouse performance with high-end gaming mice is the manufacturer's custom mouse driver software, which often needs to be correctly configured on a PC so it doesn't default to some unknown/less effective setting. Mice from companies like Corsair, Logitech, etc. have downloadable drivers for setup, and usually store these settings in the mouse memory as configuration profiles. If you have one of these mice that stores profiles internally (especially Logitech mice as their software is a bit tricky), it is important to make sure you set the mouse to maximum resolution in their software first, and program it to default to that setting so the mouse is actually running at the full resolution offered. Because these settings have to be programmed using a PC, it will it will make your life much easier if you remember do this first before connecting the mouse to your KeyMander! After setting up your mouse, make sure to set the mouse resolution in the KeyMander software to match your mouse setting. Having a 5000+ DPI mouse is great, but if you forget to change the default setting in the KeyMander software (default is 2000 DPI) you won't getting the full benefit of all that resolution!

    Hopefully this gives you a better insight into how to get the best performance out of your KeyMander for the way you play. If you still have questions, please let us know.

    Updated 8-14-2019
  • Using the KeyMander on Ghost Recon Wildland


    Hi JuneBug,

    This started out as a quick response, but to fully answer your question it turned into a book somewhere along the way.

    The biggest difficulty in getting the mouse to feel the way you expect is the turn speed limitation built into console games, which effects how fast you can turn (look) in a given direction, no matter how fast you slide your mouse. Because console games are built for joysticks, every game has a maximum turn speed that is equal to the maximum speed value reached when the analog thumb stick is pushed all the way to the farthest position. This limit can vary widely from game to game, and can even vary within a game depending on factors such as weapon choice, whether or not you’re in a vehicle, location in the game (especially in campaign modes), etc. Games can also have different horizontal and vertical turn speed limits. By the way, several games actually have different horizontal and vertical look sensitivities that are usually small enough to go unnoticed with analog sticks, but much more noticeable with a mouse. That is the reason we built in the ability to unlock the horizontal and vertical mouse sensitivity sliders.

    Just like in PC gaming, bumping KeyMander's mouse sensitivity sliders too high will cause you to reach a point where movement can become jittery and difficult to use accurately for precision shots, so reaching a balance is important. In the PC world this equates to the balance between low DPI and high DPI settings, where lower DPI is far more accurate for making small, precise movements (like needed for headshots) at the cost of having to move your hand a foot or more to turn a 360° rotation. In the older days of FPS, gamers playing titles like Counter Strike on standard definition monitors might have mouse resolutions set as low as 100 or 200 dpi, so they can snap off a headshot (without a scope) like it’s nothing. That type of play is a far cry from the common Rambo-esque, hard-charging free-for-all styles we see now in Call of Duty deathmatches, so just like in PC gaming, finding your own balance point is the key. If you run around in CoD with a shotgun and never aim-down-sight, having a highly boosted sensitivity may be fine for you, but if you later decide to pick up a sniper rifle you probably aren’t going to be happy at that setting.

    Unlike on a PC, using a mouse in an environment designed for a joystick also requires getting used to playing within the game’s turn speed limitation, but it’s a small trade-off for being able to play console games with a mouse and keyboard. When you exceed the game’s maximum turn speed, the mouse will feel sluggish as your on-screen aim/look view moves less than expected. An easy way to see this is to move your mouse at a fairly slow rate noticing how far you rotate, then move extremely fast and compare. If your KeyMander profile is set up with very high aim/look sensitivity, you probably noticed that by moving slowly you rotated 360 degrees or more with a single swipe, but by moving very fast you rotated only a short distance. The easiest way to understand what is happening is to equate the maximum turning speed to distance turned (rotated) in a period of time. For example, let’s say with the aim/look thumb stick fully engaged it takes our game one full second to perform a 360° rotation, that would make our game’s maximum turning speed equal to one rotation per second. Now to illustrate how that pertains to our mouse, let’s say that with our current KeyMander profile moving the mouse four inches in one second performs a full rotation, it would mean our max turn speed with the mouse is 4 inches per second. Now here is where the turn speed limit begins to show up with a mouse: if we move 8 inches in one second (double the limit in our example), the extra movement above the maximum turn speed is not registered and it’s as if you moved for only half the distance or half the time (equal to a half rotation for our example). Following the same formula if we move it 16 inches (four times the limit), your on-screen aim/look view moves only a quarter of the time/distance (equal to a quarter rotation for our example), and so on. Simply put, once you hit maximum turn speed, the faster you move the mouse, the slower you go.

    To get a better feel for how to best set your mouse sensitivity, start at a point where you think the sensitivity is way too low, and move your mouse back and forth. Get a feel for the ability to find your aim point accurately, then boost your speed until you can get the accuracy you want, at a comfortable enough speed to stay within the game’s maximum turn speed or at least not far beyond it. Remember each game is different, and the difference can be huge when comparing a game like CoD: Black Ops III that has a high max turn speed, versus a game like Resident Evil 7 where you can use a watch to time how long it takes to spin around. In any case, understanding the basic limitation of console games and learning how to work around them with KeyMander is the key to unlocking the best possible performance.

    As a final note, I should also mention that one of the things that can complicate getting proper mouse performance with high-end gaming mice is the manufacturer's custom mouse driver software, which often needs to be correctly configured on a PC so it doesn't default to some unknown/less effective setting. Mice from companies like Corsair, Logitech, etc. have downloadable drivers for setup, and usually store these settings in the mouse memory as configuration profiles. If you have one of these mice that stores profiles internally (especially Logitech mice as their software is a bit tricky), it is important to make sure you set the mouse to maximum resolution in their software first, and program it to default to that setting so the mouse is actually running at the full resolution offered. Because these settings have to be programmed using a PC, it will it will make your life much easier if you remember do this first before connecting the mouse to your KeyMander!

    Please let me know if this helps.
  • XB1: Overwatch sample profile (updated)


    Let's back up a bit. Just like with a PC, your mouse will move less at 800 dpi, and more at 1600 dpi. Like in PC games, console games have a sensitivity setting that acts like a multiplier, increasing small physical movements into larger in-game movements. Up to this point PC gaming and console gaming work the same way. Where they start to differ is the maximum speed at which the mouse can move.

    In most PC games you can pretty much swipe the mouse as fast as you want, and the game's aim/look mechanic will turn your aim/look view the appropriate amount. However, since console games are made for thumb stick controllers that can only move about half an inch in any direction, the games are configured to allow holding the stick in a given direction to turn your screen view at a maximum set rate so you don't get out of control screen movement. Some people become very good with thumb sticks, so games have the ability to increase the sensitivity for faster turning, but there is always a maximum turning speed limit. If not, simply pinning the thumb stick to side would cause uncontrollable movement as the turn speed would theoretically continue increasing until hitting the console's maximum rendering speed. The turning speed limit is set by the game developer, so it can vary widely from game to game.

    This is important to understand, because the turning speed limit is what causes the mouse dpi setting in PC gaming to be different from console gaming with KeyMander. Since console games have a turning speed limit, we need to increase this limit as high as possible to get the best performance from the mouse, which is why the first instruction for creating a game profile is always to turn the game's sensitivity setting to max. Because we are also converting the mouse's analog data into X/Y movement which emulates the controller output and because the game's maximum turn speed creates a window we must work within, we need that mouse data to be as accurate as possible. That means we have to configure the mouse dpi differently than we would for PC. In a PC game you might turn the mouse dpi down to keep the mouse in a desired resolution range you're used to playing, and turn the game sensitivity up to compensate for the low movement speed. With KeyMander it's almost the opposite of that, as we turn the mouse dpi to maximum or the highest resolution for maximum accuracy, and control movement speed with the sensitivity adjustment in the KeyMander software. For this reason we recommend using a mouse with at least 2000 dpi resolution or higher for basic gameplay, with higher resolution mice delivering higher levels of accuracy at peak movement speeds.
  • 2000 dpi mouse not high enough for precision?


    The GKM602R keyboard and mouse combo is designed for casual to intermediate level gamers, and comes in one of our basic kits to get people started with KeyMander. However, if you are already a more advanced gamer (and it sounds like you definitely are), you can do a few things to help smooth the mouse a little but ultimately, at your skill level you will want a higher resolution mouse to snap off quick headshots. While running and gunning in CoD games is fine with the GKM602R mouse, I normally suggest 4000 dpi or higher mice for sniping in games like BF1 or R6:S. We have a KeyMander Performance Kit available that includes a 5000 dpi mouse and is likely much better suited to your skill level.

    I'm using the Kaliber mouse as well, set on 1000DPI.KeymanderMan
    The mouse needs to be set to maximum, so if you have the same kit as Marksman with the GKM602R, then you need it set to 2000 dpi.


    I looked up what DPI settings the pros use, and most of them use like 800 or less. Higher DPI means the mouse is more sensitive to movement, right? So should we set it lower if we want to be precise with fine mouse movements?KeymanderMan
    The dpi settings you describe are for use in PC gaming, but we are playing in a console environment in a game designed for joystick controllers, so those rules do not apply. Here's some information to help you better understand the difference of the console environment, and the way to work within it with the mouse.

    It is easiest to think of it like this: PC games normally have no maximum rate of movement because they are designed for a mouse, however console games MUST have a peak speed so that when mashing the joystick to the side the speed does not increase exponentially until all you see is a blur. The game's maximum turn speed which is controlled by the in-game sensitivity setting (think Insane in Call of Duty games) sets our basic speed limit (maximum turn speed), and our software takes that movement range and divides it into resolution steps with the peak being equal to KeyMander's programmed resolution setting. The higher the resolution setting, the finer the movement steps become which is why a mouse with 4000 dpi or more will have smoother movement. It is also possible to set your mouse to exceed the game's maximum turn speed (by boosting acceleration, sensitivity or deadzone settings too high), causing the game to ignore that input and feel slow, sluggish or laggy until the mouse output (movement speed) drops down below the game's maximum turn speed. Games like Black Ops 3 have very high maximum turn speeds so they very forgiving with an incorrectly adjusted mouse, but games like Rainbow Six: Siege have a lower maximum turn speed and require more testing and tweaking to dial in a good setting. Now, this description is a huge oversimplification and is not a perfectly accurate depiction of the process, but it does make it much simpler to understand the basics of what is happening to better set up your mouse so I hope it helps.
  • Aiming jittery


    Hi Cris574,

    What console are you using? You may be able to use a Battlefield 4 profile as a base, and adjust the deadzones and mouse sensitivity as needed.

    The deadzone setting counteracts the non-responsive area built around the controllers' thumbsticks which causess slow response when moving or lack of response when making tiny movements. It needs to be set correctly, but that is not what is causing the issue you described.

    A jittery mouse response can be caused by a few different things, and since we don't know what mouse you are using we will check the usual suspects:
    1. Profile mouse sensitivity- Having the mouse dpi and/or the KeyMander's mouse dpi setting too low, while the profile's mouse sensitivity is set too high can cause a choppy mouse response. Think of the mouse's maximum dpi as a maximum accuracy range, and think of the mouse sensitivity setting in the profile as the scale by which that maximum range is chopped up. The higher the dpi range, the finer the control you have within the maximum range. If we have a range of 1-100 in blocks of ten, you have ten options for sensitivity. If we change to blocks of 1, you get 100 options and a lot more ability to dial in a perfect setting.
    2. Exceeding maximum turn speed- If you have the mouse sensitivity set too high and exceed the game's maximum turning speed, you will have poor response with the mouse. Read this link Understanding Mouse Settings and make sure to set the mouse sensitivity so that peak mouse speed is near or not too far over the game's max turn speed. I prefer to set the sensitivity so that the fastest speed I normally swipe is about at the max turn speed. This gives me a good overall feel for most games without having to make a custom mouse curve. As you get better with KeyMander or the more you play certain games, you may find yourself wanting to have a faster initial mouse speed or a lower upper speed limit, etc. so at that point it's worth spending the time to create a custom mouse curve.
    3. Mouse sensor vs. gaming surface- This is a somewhat common problem and an easy fix. Some mouse sensor types work better on certain surfaces, so get an appropriate type of mouse pad for your sensor type. If you are using an optical mouse, use a good textile type mouse pad. If you are using a laser mouse, try a harder surface pad. There is a lot of really tweaky information on the web if you are interested, but any decent mouse pad will normally work well enough. You really just need to make sure you're not using the mouse directly on a desk, or highly reflective surface such as metal or glass.

    Let me know if this helps!
  • Aiming lag


    As I mentioned, there isn't any aiming lag in KeyMander but if you exceed Rainbow Six's maximum turn speed you will feel it move slower and slower the more you exceed the limit (the faster you go). Basically, while you are moving faster than the game's max turn speed input, the game will stop responding until the speed drops back down below the maximum input level, giving you that "lag" feel. R6S has a much lower maximum turn speed than games like Call of Duty Black Ops 3, so the effect is much more noticeable. To get familiar with the game's maximum turn speed, just hold the right controller stick all the way to the right and watch your view to see the fastest look speed that game can attain. You will need to get a feel for this speed and learn to move your mouse within this speed limit. You also need to set your mouse properly as described above, since too much boost in sensitivity will easily cause you to jump above the max turn speed and feel.

    Here's our sample profile for Rainbow Six: Siege. After you download it and import it into the KeyMander software, remember to upload to KeyMander before you are done! Set the in-game settings as noted on the profile page and you should be good.
  • Destiny setup problem.


    Hi cyberdevil3,
    I don't think you're experiencing input lag, but rather you're exceeding the game's maximum turn speed. Read this to get an understanding of maximum turn speed, which when exceeded leads to a performance issue many people incorrectly attribute to input lag: Understanding Mouse Settings. Destiny has a very low maximum turn speed, which is why it feels like input lag to you. If you were to play Call of Duty: Black Ops III or Infinite Warfare with the same mouse settings you would not feel the same limitation.

    Without going too far into the geeky minutiae of mouse performance, here's how to set up your Death Adder Elite with KeyMander. Your mouse uses the PMW3389-T3QU sensor (seems to be a version of the PMW3366 sensor) which unlike non PMW-3366 mice, does not have a native resolution so you can set it at any resolution (in 100dpi steps using the Razer software) without the impact to performance that mice with interpolated resolutions have. This basically means you can set the mouse to our current sensitivity limit of 10000dpi without issue. I've read this mouse does have some smoothing (pixel averaging), but most people say it is not noticeable unless moving very slow speed at higher dpi settings (like when sniping at long range targets). I have not personally used this mouse, so I would set it at 10K and test it out while learning to stay within Destiny's turn speed limitation. I've also seen recommendations for low dpi PC gamers using the DA Elite to set it to 1800dpi which has no smoothing, but requires more in-game sensitivity which for KeyMander users means using higher mouse sensitivity. The bottom line is to try it out and see what works best for you, but no matter what you must work on getting a feel for the game's maximum turn speed.

    Let us know if this helps.
  • Xbox 360 profiles


    There are a few key differences between PC games and console games using a mouse and keyboard, but once you understand them and work within the console limitations, you will have a much better experience with your KeyMander. Some of these key differences like maximum turn speed are addressed here.

    Consoles have about 3-8ms of latency for their control input with 8ms being from the polling speed of the console's USB ports (125Hz) compared to 1ms for PC (1000Hz polling speed). This normally isn't noticed as much when using an analog controller because the stick's dead zone and ramp up speed slow your look speed anyway, however a mouse doesn't have those limitations so under the right circumstances it is possible to notice some latency.

    Speaking of right circumstances, swiping the mouse back and forth quickly as if testing mouse response is one of the circumstances under which you could notice latency depending upon the game and your settings. Games using the higher 60fps frame rate have less noticeable latency than 30fps games, so this is one of the reasons Call of Duty: Black Ops III feels more responsive than Rainbow Six: Siege. Also, since BO3 has a much higher maximum turn speed, your can run much faster aim/look speeds without getting choppy.

    The dead zone setting also plays a role here in the response speed versus choppiness. Setting the dead zone lower will increase mouse speed and response, but making it too low leads to a choppy/jittery stair step-like effect which kills long range accuracy. Raising dead zone will feel smoother when moving, but will decrease speed and reaction which feels laggy when making small moves.

    The maximum resolution of the mouse also comes into play as mice with higher resolutions can run with higher aim/look speeds before becoming choppy. The maxim resolution of the mouse in your Wireless KeyMander Kit is 2000 dpi, which is enough to play pretty well for many users, but more competitive gamers should transition to a mouse with a higher maximum resolution of 4000 dpi or more.

    The sample profiles provided balance all these factors and play well for most users. For those seeking to reach the top of the leaderboard these profiles provide a good starting point for tweaking the settings for your equipment (mouse) and your style of play, so you can get the best possible performance.
  • Does KeyMander add delay?

    One of the most common questions asked by perspective KeyMander buyers is what amount (if any) of delay/lag/latency does the KeyMander add, so it makes sense to address it here in our FAQ for easy reference.

    While KeyMander technically does not add any delay itself, there is 8ms of actual input lag (latency) due to the console’s USB speed of 125Hz which equates to 8ms. A wireless controller averages about a 4ms latency (which is counter-intuitive, but that’s another matter for another time), so the 4ms difference between the controller and the KeyMander is imperceptible. In fact, if you have ever used the controller in wired mode with a USB cable, like when batteries are dead, or when the wireless performance is suffering controller dropout, the wired performance you experience is the same as when using KeyMander since they both use USB.

    The performance issues often attributed to latency by new users are actually caused by problems like incorrectly adjusted dead zones, poorly configured mouse settings, exceeding the game’s maximum turning speed, or poor aim/look mechanics built into some games, all of which can cause the mouse to feel laggy, choppy etc. if not addressed. Additionally, issues with a game's maximum turn speed or its aim/look mechanics are normally masked by controllers, because initiating movement or changing directions at high speed with a thumb stick is nowhere the speed that can be attained when using a mouse. This means issues that previously went unnoticed in some games may suddenly be highlighted by KeyMander. The usual solution to most mouse performance issues is using the KeyMander software to optimize the mouse for the game being played.

    Now with all that said, no latency discussion is complete without reviewing the issues that really do lead to a significant delay between actions in-game and actions on-screen. So, here’s a look at the things we know that have an actual measurable delay effect on the game:

    Game type- The type of game being played will definitely have a pronounced feel and effect when it comes to things like input lag. FPS console games like the Call of Duty franchise which feature fast online multi-player game play and very high maximum turn speeds, will be more sensitive to any delay than slower, story driven games like Witcher 3, etc.

    Game Framerate- Consoles games generally run at either 30 or 60 frames per second, with the 60 fps games having a lower latency than those running at 30 frames per second. Outside of the aim/look mechanics, higher framerate is another reason games like Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare which runs at 60fps, feel much more responsive than The Division which runs at only 30fps.

    Game Controller- The latency of the factory wireless game controllers is approximately 4ms, but aftermarket controllers can have as high as a 16ms delay.

    Monitors- Most monitors feature response times of 1ms up to around 10ms (average less than 5ms), and have display lag times from 9ms to over 20ms (average around 11ms). Gaming monitors with their 1-2ms response time and average 10ms display lag, provide the best performance for both PC and console gamers.

    HDTVs- HDTVs are much slower display devices than monitors, having twice the lag time or more than monitors due to all the image processing. With lag times form 20ms to over 100ms (average around 40ms), HDTV’s can be a significant source of latency when gaming. The performance of most recent HDTVs can be improved somewhat by using the TV’s game mode (if equipped) to turn off the image processing and reduce delay. The larger the screen often times means the greater the lag time, so check your display’s lag time here and make sure it’s not the biggest culprit in lowering your multiplayer Kill/Death ratio: https://displaylag.com/

    Online Connection- Although your internet connection does not normally affect how quickly your input actions are reflected in the game, your connection quality and speed have a huge impact in your ability to react and are arguably more relevant than the tiny amount of lag from a peripheral. Playing games with a faster time-to-kill speed (TTK) like the Call of Duty franchises allow much less reaction time than games like Battlefield or Halo (their weapons don’t kill as fast). That means playing Call of Duty on a slow connection (200ms+) you could get killed before you can react to the shots, or worse yet get killed before ever seeing the threat. Even in slower paced games the end result could be the same if playing on a very laggy HDTV.

    In short, overall performance is a culmination of several factors, and while having your KeyMander properly configured is key to improving your game, you must also pay attention to the areas above and optimize where possible if you want to reach the upper echelon of console gaming.
  • GE1337P_SW_V1.2.115.003.exe issue


    If your posts are not immediately showing and you have not used prohibited language, then you have somehow been flagged by our spam filter for some reason. I have asked our forum manager to look into it as a couple other people's posts have been have been flagged for unknown reasons as well.

    If you are experiencing lag with the GKM602R mouse, please try your G402 with the same settings and see if the problem persists. If the response is slow with both mice it is a problem with the way you have configured your profile, and we can help you fix it with some basic information from you. If the problem is only with the GKM602R mouse, then it may be a problem with the wireless dongle and it may need to be replaced. Please check and let us know so we can replace the dongle if needed.

    Mouse keeps changing its speeds on its own right after I set it up, You have 2 acceleration types, and the + and - button on the mouse keeps resetting.Pulse
    Which mouse is changing speeds by itself, the GKM602R mouse, the G402 mouse, or both?

    The Mouse app speed is at max, my ingame sensitivity is at 10 max for mw3 and aim down is super slow but in the keymander its at 200. its amazing how my look without aim down sight is 100 and its really fast. But ADS is super slow.Pulse
    This is normally the result of exceeding the game's maximum turn speed (see Maximum Turn Speed here), but I need more information to better help. A sensitivity setting of 200 is way too high, and is probably exceeding the turn speed limit of both games, but it should be better in MW3 than BF4 because the turn speed limit in MW3 is much higher. Upload the profile you're using or upload a screen shot of your setting as we can help dial it in.
  • Call of Duty Infinite Warfare Mouse Settings


    1200 dpi is very low to be playing CoD. If you use the sample profile posted and set the KeyMander dpi to match the mouse at 1200 it will work, but movement may be slower than expected or if you turn up the sensitivity too high to compensate it can become blocky. We can help you find a playable compromise, but if you upgrade your mouse to something with a gaming sensor and at least 4000 dpi you will have much better performance and satisfaction. It will also be much easier to fine tune the settings to your style of play when you have more dpi to work with.

    Mouse lag usually comes from exceeding the game's maximum turn speed, but that isn't normally an issue with COD titles. However, when you crank up the sensitivity to account for lower maximum mouse resolution, you can get to the point where you exceed the max turn speed and movement feels slower and laggy. You can read here about maximum turn speed and additional factors that effect mouse performance. It will give you a much better insight how to properly fine tune your mouse for best performance.
  • programible buttons on g600


    You have several issues working against you, so let's go through them one at a time.
    First, when the mouse settings feel different while connected to the PC, it means your Windows mouse settings are influencing your mouse input into the KeyMander. You need to change your Windows mouse settings to 6/11 and turn off "enhance pointer precision" as described here.

    Next, the mouse isn't laggy, what you are experiencing is having the mouse sensitivity, deadzone and/or acceleration set too high and exceeding the game's maximum turn speed as described here. Once you have exceeded the maximum input speed for the game, the faster you move the mouse, the slower it will feel in game. You need to start by using the sample profile for your game and using the in-game settings as listed on the sample profile. Once you have a feel for things you can start making adjustments, but you must learn to work within the game's maximum turn speed as explained in the link in this paragraph.

    The G600 has on-board memory, but it must be set up in the Logitech software as "persistent" profile so that whatever macros or button bindings you make will stay saved in the mouse. Normally I suggest using the KeyMander software to do this, and if you are programming the mouse side buttons you will select the "Forward" and "Back" buttons in the drop down menu.
  • XB1: The Division sample profile


    Ok, now I know what you mean. This is the main complaint with The Division, as it has a poor aim/look engine that hasn't been improved in even the newest 1.6 revision. The mechanics have some unpredictable movement in it, including an initial movement lag (not caused by KeyMander) that acts like a non-removable deadzone, plus a low maximum turn speed and some bizarre acceleration curves that bump your look speed at a time you would least prefer it. Try moving the mouse very slowly as if trying to move 1 pixel at a time and you will see the look view doesn't move until you speed up. Start speeding up a bit more and you will see it take off, making it hard to develop a feel for point shooting. This is a game mechanic and something we can't change so must work around the best we can. Make sure you have Aim Assist off or it makes a less than desirable aim/look engine even worse.

    That said, we can definitely improve some things to make the game enjoyable. First, make sure your TV or monitor is set to game mode (if it has one) to lower the input lag as much as possible, TVs are generally worse than monitors as they usually add lag on their own; not a ton, but a noticeable amount which becomes more noticeable with The Division. Second, if you have a mouse with a bit higher max DPI, use it- 4000-5000 DPI is definitely helpful.

    I've been tinkering with the attached profile in The Division 1.6 build. The attached profile also uses the forward mouse button for turn assist, which greatly helps turning a quick 180 to counter the game's low maximum turn speed.

    The attached profile was made for the following in-game settings:
    Camera sensitivity: 100%
    Aim sensitivity: 100%
    Scope sensitivity: 100%
    Analog dead zone size: 0%
    Aim assist: Off
  • Mouse flick


    Hi Hamz, what you are experiencing is exceeding the game's turn speed limit explained here. If you have the mouse sensitivity set too high and move too quickly you will exceed the game's maximum turning speed, and will have poor mouse response. Make sure to set the mouse sensitivity so that peak mouse speed is near or not too far over the game's max turn speed. I prefer to set the sensitivity so that the fastest speed I normally swipe is about at the max turn speed. This gives me a good overall feel for most games without having to make a custom mouse curve. As you get better with KeyMander or the more you play certain games, you may find yourself wanting to have a faster initial mouse speed or a lower upper speed limit, etc. so at that point it's worth spending the time to create a custom mouse curve explained here.

    Let me know if this helps.
  • Controller and keyboard on but not working? help!


    Hi MiningYeti,
    What you feel is not input delay, but rather input signal clipping caused by exceeding the game's maximum turn speed with an incorrectly set mouse resolution and sensitivity setting as described here. What game are you playing?

    For all games you need to first make sure you have set the game's X and Y sensitivity to maximum, then set the mouse's resolution to maximum which must be at least 2000dpi or higher to work with KeyMander. After that, set the KeyMander's dpi setting to match the mouse setting. Note: if the mouse has more than 10K dpi, set it to 10K and set KeyMander to 10K as well. If you have a mouse with a very low resolution and are trying to get faster movement while aiming-down-sight, you may experience a blocky-like movement which is the lack of mouse resolution at the chosen sensitivity/acceleration setting. Reduce the mouse sensitivity and/or acceleration setting and you will have smoother movement but at a slower pace.

    After the console verifies the controller authorization, the mouse and keyboard may continue to work for a time after the controller is removed on some games, but will eventually stop working unless the controller is reconnected before the console checks for controller authorization again.
  • Twitchy Aim for Hunt: Showdown on PS4


    We ordered the game today so we will create a profile for it so we can see what's going on. Here's a simple test to see if the game's speed limit is the issue or something else. With the in-game sensitivity set at maximum, hold the right thumbstick all the way to the right and see how fast it turns. If you are trying to turn faster than that, the game's maximum turn speed is the issue. If that speed is fine but you cannot make it turn that fast with the mouse, it may be a deadzone issue or something else. Let us know what you find with that test.
  • I need help


    Ok, that makes sense now. You likely set the sensitivity too high and are experiencing the turn speed limit which is explained here. R6S has a lower maximum turn speed than games like Call of Duty, so if you are a wrist flick style player as opposed to an arm movement style of player you will need to get used to working within the maximum turn speed of R6S. Please read the link I added above and then make very small sensitivity adjustments until you find the happy medium that works for you.
  • Understanding KeyMander Mouse Settings


    The one difference from PC gaming that we always have to deal with is the game's maximum turning speed explain on the first post in this thread. That will dictate how fast you can move, which in games like Call of Duty: Black Ops III is extremely fast, but in games like The Division it is much slower. Once you get a feel for the game's maximum speed, you can more easily dial in your settings to your style of play.

    Next, you said you have the Rival 300 which is a GREAT gaming mouse using the Pixart 3310 "flawless" sensor, so it will perform extremely well if set up properly. Since we are not actually using a PC, the old rules for using lower CPI/DPI do not apply here. Turn the CPI to the maximum at 6500 and make sure to set the KeyMander software DPI setting to the same. Your mouse will move faster and also more smoothly at lower speeds because we are making use of the full range of available CPI to work within. Currently you have capped the range at 1350, so you will have "blocky" adjustment steps that don't give you the full performance of that mouse.
  • R6


    With the turn speed cap and non-linear movement curves you need to get a feel for the maximum speed and adjust your play style a bit for it. If you take your controller's right thumbstick and hold it to the left or right, that is the maximum turn speed of the game and as you can see, it's really easy to move the mouse faster than that which is what creates the issue. I will be creating a profile for the Classic control setting next week which may feel better to you depending on your play style.
  • keyboard not working urgent help needed


    We haven't tested that keyboard, so I can't say if that is the issue. Do you have another PC keyboard you can try?


    The problem you're experiencing is running past the games maximum turn speed. If you have your sensitivity boosted too high you will exceed the game's max turning speed and the mouse will feel progressively slower the faster you move it. Here's some information to help explain it. Yes, this can be fixed by making sure the game's aim/look sensitivity is set to max (use the settings shown in our sample profile for Overwatch), your mouse's dpi is set to maximum on the mouse itself, matching that setting in the KeyMander software, then working to set the mouse sensitivity within the game's max turning speed which is actually pretty high for Overwatch.
  • Got a New PC and my keyboard works but my mouse has alot of delay.


    Hi Jacob,
    I think you have a couple issues going on here. First, are you getting a delay with the keyboard and the mouse or just the mouse? If you get a delay with the just the mouse you are most likely using too high a mouse sensitivity setting and/or too much acceleration which exceeds the game's maximum turning speed and clips the controller input as described here. If this is the case, the faster you move the mouse the slower the mouse moves. Make sure to set the in-game sensitivity to maximum and test the R6:S sample profile from the forum to see if it solves the maximum turn speed issue.

    The second problem with a choppy mouse movement can be caused by a few different things. First, what mouse are you using and what is the sensitivity at which you have both it and the KeyMander set? Low resolution mice can become choppy or "stair-steppy" in their movement if the KeyMander sensitivity is set too high for their sensor. This can also be caused by incorrectly adjusted deadzone settings that require too much mouse movement before registering. Let us know what mouse and what dpi settings you are using and we can better help.
  • Prowler PUBG 1.0 Profile Release (black diamond profile)

    I move the mouse and it moves like a second laterLongOverStrong
    This is exactly what happens when you exceed the game's maximum turn speed, and the more you exceed it, the slower you go. Please see the section on Maximum Turn Speed (In-Game) here and it will explain it in detail. Did you remember to upload the profile to your KeyMander after you set it up? If not, you are not playing with those settings unless you are in PC Play Mode.
  • KeyMander Compatible Keyboards and Mice


    There's no lag with any of them, but if the mouse is not set up properly you can experience a problem with exceeding the game's maximum turn speed as explained here. I recommend any good gaming mouse with at least 4000 dpi or more and I personally prefer the PMW3360/3366/3367 sensor family as I feel they are the best for FPS games.
  • XB1: Rainbow Six: Siege profile


    If your in-game acceleration is set at 100, that's the problem. That is adding a huge amount of boost and certainly exceeding the turn speed limit of the game. If you take your controller's right thumbstick and hold it to the left or right, that is the maximum turn speed of the game. With the extra boost you've added it's extremely easy to move the mouse faster than that which is what creates the issue. Turn the acceleration back down to 35 adjust mouse movement first. If you need a little boost after it's close, then add 3 steps at a time until it feel good or until you hit the turn speed cap of the game.
  • need help finding perfect medium to low sensitivity for r6s


    The console version of R6S has a low maximum turn speed so balancing 180 flicks with smooth ADS is very tough. I think the best way to preserve low speed accuracy is to create a custom curve that has a big speed bump for when you quick flick. Check this out and try experimenting with Low Aim Speed/High Turn Speed curves!
  • Mouse for rainbow six siege on PS4


    There are a couple things that will help with micro movement jitter. First, fine tuning the dead zone will lower the threshold for movement to be recognized, so it will seem less "jumpy" between small movements. This will offset your speed some, so you need to find the balance for your style of play.

    Next, the higher the maximum resolution of your mouse, the finer the movement steps can be broken down. A lower sensitivity mouse will have larger movement steps, and a higher sensitivity mouse will have smaller steps allowing more precise fine tuning for sniping, etc.

    Finding the right acceleration balance in the mouse settings to fit your style of play will also help. Because most games have various amounts of boost added to compensate for the slow analog sticks, the goal is to find the balance between cutting the game's boost for accuracy, and still maintaining an aim/look speed that is fast enough to be playable while not continually exceeding the game's maximum turn speed.

    These are the areas we work to balance for the average user with the sample profiles. The hardcore gamers will benefit from time spent tweaking the profile for their style of play since there are many things that can be done. Once you have something you feel is on the right track, you can really dial it in using the Mouse Curve. This is an advanced feature and can really make a profile feel awesome or awful depending how much time you are willing to spend learning how minor adjustments respond in your game.
  • Delay and Jittering


    Hi Tryston,
    Did you use the listed settings for the Destiny 2 in-game menu? Destiny has a fairly slow turn speed limit (as explained here) so after making the required changed to the in-game settings, you can hold the thumbstick to the left or right and that is as fast as you can possibly turn, no matter how fast you move the mouse. If you exceed that speed you will actually move slower as the game ignores any input past the maximum turn speed.
  • XB1: The Division sample profile


    The Division does have a terrible aim/look mechanic and a low max turn speed, so it does not feel anywhere near as good as a CoD game, or even Battlefield 1. The key is making sure it doesn't feel laggy. If it does, you have the speed boosted too high with either acceleration, sensitivity or deadzone setting, and are exceeding the game's maximum turn speed.
  • Rainbow Six siege Settings


    The way the KeyMander is designed you can use the sample profile settings at any DPI between 2K and 10K and movement speed will be the same. However, having the mouse DPI set at 3500-5000 (with the KeyMander sensitivity set to match) will provide a smoother mouse feel. Once you have the mouse moving smoothly you can make small mouse sensitivity changes until you reach something that feels good to you. Keep in mind that R6S has a relatively low maximum turn speed compared to games like Call of Duty, so you can't just crank up the sensitivity blindly or you will reach a point where the mouse feels like it is laggy, indicating you have exceeded the game's max turn speed as explained here.
  • XB1: Rainbow Six: Siege profile


    I'm guessing you have your mouse movement turned up pretty high in the KeyMander software, if so you are likely exceeding the game's turn speed limit as explained here. You'll need to turn the sensitivity back down and get a feel for working within the maximum turn speed. Are you using the newest profile from last week and using the in-game settings shown on page one of this thread?

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